All News

CFRP in the News: FiveThirtyEight and NPR

March 2, 2015

Are Moms Less Likely than Dads to Pay Child Support? 

Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight’s Mona Chalibi asks this interesting question and has a surprising answer. CFRP Director, Dr. Cynthia Osborne, was asked to help explain. The story was also produced as a radio segment on NPR that aired yesterday, March 1st. See below for links.

New Published Paper in Journal of Applied Research on Children

Feb. 10, 2015

Congratulations to Dr. Cynthia Osborne and Daniel Dillon on their newest published paper in the Journal of Applied Research on Children: Informing Policy for Children at Risk: Vol. 5: Iss. 2: "Dads on the Dotted Line: A Look at the In-Hospital Paternity Establishment Process."

New CFRP Working Papers

Jan. 16, 2015

Understanding Today's Changing Families - When their children are born, most unmarried parents have high expectations for the future, but they are particularly vulnerable to financial and relationship instability. Their children are disproportionately likely to experience negative health and wellbeing outcomes, in part because of low father involvement.

Save the Date 4/16/15: CFRP Symposium on Evidence-Based Policy and Its Limits

Jan. 16, 2015

CFRP Symposium on Evidence-Based Policy and Its Limits 

Keynote Speaker - Dr. Ron Haskins
Thursday, April 16, 2015, 9:00am-12:30pm
LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin

CFRP Year in Pictures: 2014

Dec. 18, 2014

We hope you had as wonderful a 2014 as we did! The amount of custom surveys, focus groups, data analysis, travel all over Texas and the country, journal writing, report writing, brief writing, data visualizations, presentations, and special events that we have conducted/ developed/ coordinated/ managed over just one year boggles our minds sometimes. But we've also had an amazing amount of fun with each other. Here is CFRP's 2014 year how we like to remember it best, in pictures!

5 Things You Should Know about Home Visiting in Texas: A Two-Generation Approach to Supporting Families

Dec. 16, 2014

Home visiting programs have rapidly expanded across the country as an evidence-based policy choice for supporting families with young children. CFRP is currently conducting an ongoing program implementation evaluation of the Texas Home Visiting Program (THV) as well as two related, ongoing evaluations that focus on the factors that influence father participation in home visiting and the factors that influence the retention of families in home visiting programs.

New Brief about Those On the Front Lines of Paternity Establishment, Birth Registrars

Dec. 3, 2014

Because children of unmarried parents do not have a legal father until paternity is established, federal and state laws mandate provision of readily accessible means of establishing paternity. In Texas, each hospital provides an Acknowledgment of Paternity (AOP) form for parents to sign as part of the birth registration process.

Post Event Wrap-up: Toxic Stress and Early Childhood

Nov. 18, 2014

Toxic Stress and Early Childhood: What Policy Makers and Funders Need to Know

Friday, November 14, 2014 - Texas State Capitol Auditorium & Legislative Conference Center

The Child and Family Research Partnership at The University of Texas at Austin's LBJ School of Public Affairs, TexProtects, and the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) co-hosted the event to inform policy makers, professionals, and academics about the impacts of early childhood adversity on physiological development.

Two-Generation Approaches to Breaking the Cycle of Poverty

Nov. 13, 2014

The Annie E. Casey Foundation recently released a policy report calling for policymakers to focus on equipping both children and parents with the resources and skills they need to ensure the future success of today’s children.

Toxic Stress 101

Nov. 10, 2014

What is toxic stress? Go to our new Storify on the topic for invaluable resources and links to research, news articles, CFRP's toxic stress infographic and more at https://storify.com/cfrplbj.